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A Relatively Recent Rising Sea level
has altered Bay area Placer Gold Distribution

bees on a bee hive honeycomb
Global sea levels are rising for 20,000 years and have gone up 300 feet since the last Ice Age

It notes that sea levels were probably 4-6m (13-19½ft) higher when temperatures were 3 higher than the present in a period between ice ages 125,000 years ago.

Geologists at Stanford settled a long-simmering dispute over the age of the Sierra Nevada range by studying gravel that was soaked with rainwater eons ago. The residue of trapped water contains both regular hydrogen atoms and a heavier isotope, deuterium. Deuterium-laden water falls at lower altitudes, so the ratio of isotopes can indicate how high the gravel was when the rain fell. The ratios in Sierra samples 45 million years old resemble those in modern rainfall from the same locations, which suggests the range's height hasn't changed for tens of millions of years. Most scientists had put the Sierras' age at under 5 million years old.

Figure 13. Gold in herringbone growth pattern, Idarado mine, vein unknown, Ouray/San Miguel counties. Longest herringbones are 4 mm. Benjy and Liz Kuehling specimen; photo by author. Figure 14. Gold in petzite, Gold King mine, Gladstone district, San Juan County. Area with gold 4 cm across. Benjy and Liz Kuehling specimen; photo by author. Figure 15 (below). Gold after sylvanite (shows "graphic tellurium" habit), Cripple Creek district, Teller County. Field of view approximately 6 cm across. Colorado School of Mines Museum specimen; photo by author. Figure 16. Gold in quartz, 14-40E raise, 3 level, Blue Bird ore shoot, Camp Bird mine, Sneffels district, Ouray County. Specimen 6 cm long. Tom Rosemeyer specimen; photo by author.Figure 25 (right). Irregular wires of electrum scattered across quartz crystals from the Smuggler-Union mine, Marshall Basin, Telluride district, San Miguel County. Longest wire 1 cm. Benjy and Liz Kuehling specimen; photo by author. Figure 26 (far right). Supergene gold wires on quartz and chalcedony, Cripple Creek district, Teller County. Field of view 35 mm across. Benjy and Liz Kuehling specimen; photo by author.Figure 20 (above). Complex intergrowth of gold leaves on matrix, Smuggler-Union mine, Telluride district, San Miguel County. Cluster of leaves 4 by 2.5 cm. Boettcher specimen (#27), Colorado School of Mines Museum; photo by author. Figure 21 (right). Gold wire, Little Jonny mine, Breece Hill area, Leadville district, Lake County. Wire 8.5 cm long. Specimen owner anonymous; photo by author. Figure 22 (above). Wire gold on limonitic matrix, Ground Hog mine, Gilman district, Eagle County. Wire 13.8 cm long. Denver Museum of Natural History specimen (#186); photo by author.